Pieces Of A Wunderkind's Mind

Snippets of Life, Love, Food, Travels, Discoveries, and Whatnot

Turning Mediterranean

on March 4, 2010

Buzz about a new foodie area known as Burgos Circle in Fort Bonfacio has piqued my interest. The fact that the Circle, similar to Serendra, offers an array of cuisines [American, Chinese, Spanish, Japanese, Indian-Mediterranean, and Filipino] has made it a budding hotspot. It is basically a small [food] world.



Our first foray into the Burgos Circle in The Fort Global City has led us to this Neo-Mediterranean restaurant named The Kebab Factory. Tip: Don’t forget to place a reservation especially on a weekend night. It took Francis and I an hour of waiting before we got our table. Lesson learned.




On with the food. For our appetizer, we got Hummus. Theirs was made with a “special” Tahini paste and was served with pita bread. It was ok. There was nothing special about it or the chickpeas-paste mixture they used. We should have chosen a better starter.



We were then given a small platter of condiments which held a dish of garlic sauce and another of chili sauce. These sauces, as I have heard, goes well with every dish. The garlic sauce was sweet yet had the strong garlicky taste it’s supposed to bring. It was addicting. The chili sauce lived up to its name. It was extremely hot even if its appearance made us think otherwise.



Apparently, given the restaurant’s name, the kebab had to be ordered. And so we did and asked for the Chicken Mast Kebab. We thought a skewer is expensive at P130 but then it would not be enough for us to share. So we decided to get a regular order [2 skewers] at P250. It was pleasantly surprising to see that the kebabs are made of huge, lightly seared, juicy chicken chunks that burst with flavor with every bite. The kebabs were served with grilled tomatoes. We tried adding some of the garlic sauce on it and it was amazing! With the size, amount of serving, and taste of these kebabs, I did not question why TKF’s kebabs are more costly than that of other kebab places out there.



We also had the Beef Keema. The dish was actually made of minced beef sauteed in onions and tomatoes and flavored with Indian spices. When this was brought to our table, we were quite disappointed with how it appeared to be. We were expecting a somewhat sauce-y dish but what greeted us was just a bowl of plain & simple sauteed ground beef — dry and boring. But the first spoonful instantly changed our minds about it. It was absolutely delicious. We immediately understood why it was labeled a house favorite. As cliché would have it, the beef keema was to-die-for! The spices complemented the sweetness of the onions, the beef’s flavor and the the tomatoes’ slight sourness so well. It was even more delectable when we paired it with the garlic sauce. We totally loved this dish.



We ordered a bowl of Basmati rice to go with our kebabs and keema. A serving of these steamed long-grain rice costs P85. It came in a pretty bronze bowl.



To down our rich Indian dinner, we got ourselves a glass of Sweet Lassi each. Lassi is a popular and traditional South Asian yogurt-based drink. It is made by blending yogurt with water or milk and Indian spices. Sweet lassi is blended with sugar, instead of spices. It was just like drinking a big glass of Yakult shake. Our drink was one of the highlights of our meal. You can get it for P80. Plus you have a choice between picking a sweet [just like what we had] or a salted version. We weren’t too adventurous that night to try out the salted one. Next time, maybe.



A meal would not be complete without dessert. And for this favorite part of the meal, we ordered Mango Kulfi. Kulfi is a flavored frozen dessert made from milk which originated in South Asia and is popular throughout neighboring countries in the Middle East. It has similarities to ice cream in taste, texture and preparation. We have first tried kulfi in Andanita Taj [Tagaytay]. I did not enjoy it that much because the only available flavor at the time was rose. I personally think rose and ice cream do not go well. This time, with the mango variant, things were different. It was so delicious that I almost finished Francis’ order. Fresh mangoes were used and it was garnished with ground pistachios. The spices were subdued. It was YUMMY!



In spite of the long wait for table availability [which was definitely my bad], I find myself forwardly announcing that The Kebab Factory is one of the better venues for either a steady nightout or an aggressive pigout with family and friends. With its unassuming interiors and a menu adapted to the Filipino palate, the restaurant is indeed one of those places anyone would return to for authentic and spicy mid-range Mediterranean cuisine.


The Kebab Factory
Unit 154 Forbeswood Heights, Burgos Circle corner
Rizal Drive, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig
+632.403.4159

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4 responses to “Turning Mediterranean

  1. […] Lassi [P75] is a popular and traditional South Asian yogurt-based drink. It is made by blending yogurt with water or milk and Indian spices. I ordered a tall glass of mango lassi. I enjoyed it a lot. It was like drinking ripe mango shake blended with Yakult. By now, I think you know how I adore Yakult so this drink’s good in my book. […]

  2. […] Lassi [P75] is a popular and traditional South Asian yogurt-based drink. It is made by blending yogurt with water or milk and Indian spices. I ordered a tall glass of mango lassi. I enjoyed it a lot. It was like drinking ripe mango shake blended with Yakult. By now, I think you know how I adore Yakult so this drink’s good in my book. […]

  3. Saman Sohrabi Langroudi says:

    Good day. This is one of the sons of owners of Hossein’s Persian Kebab and i would like to clarify that Kebab Factory is not owned by me or any of my siblings. We would not like to be associated with kebab factory or any other restaurant other than Hossein’s Persian Kebab. I would like you to delete the Message saying that kebab factory is owned by the heirs of Hossein’s Persian Kebab. Thank you

    • dashashash says:

      I was misinformed if that’s the case. I appreciate the correction. Please know that I am utterly sorry. I already have deleted the lines providing the wrong information. Kindly accept my sincerest apology.

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